My barber is another Yankee-to-West Coast transplant and he brought a low-mileage 2003 Mercury Grand Marquis.

My barber is another Yankee-to-West Coast transplant and he brought a low-mileage 2003 Mercury Grand Marquis. It’s very nice but every now and then the air suspension decides to get wonky and the car settles down as he’s driving along. As a barber he doesn’t have much $ to throw at it, and he asked me if I knew what to do. I think this is a Panther chassis so any old cop car or taxi’s coil springs and shocks should be a fairly easy air suspension-to-coil springs retrofit but I’m physically not up to the job. How do I find one of the myriad hole-in-the-wall shops that fixes up old cop cars for the movies and TV? I’m sure they’d have the parts and knowledge on hand and be affordable to boot. Once this is fixed he’ll consider replacing the weepy AC evaporator deep inside the dashboard (shudder). Of course it’s a Panther, hence why any shop can do the air-to-coil conversion with a donor (i.e. 1998-up, avoid cop car spring rates unless you do all four) with springs, rubber seats and this video. Or, if they don’t venture out to junkyards, the conversion kits are very cheap.  Even the kits that include new shocks are cheap, for most. But the cheapest way is to recruit someone (i.e. ...

There’s a reason why the Super Street staff heads to Spocom year after year. You can

There’s a reason why the Super Street staff heads to Spocom year after year. You can expect to see great builds in one event at a Spocom show, even midway through the year after countless vehicle debuts over several other shows. The name “Spocom” itself is hybridization of the words “sport” and “compact,” and it was back in ’06 when its founders felt like they needed to revive and keep the scene alive with a new kind of car exhibition. The following year the team held its first official event, and now ten years later Spocom returns to what’s become its customary home, the Anaheim Convention Center, as it has for the last few years. One of Spocom’s strengths is its ability to bring in a diversity of cars, especially of the vintage variety. Rick Ishitani brought out his ’71 Nissan Skyline and word on the street is it was restored by legendary vintage car builders, Rocky Auto. Instead of making another GT-R clone, Rick embraced his trim and kept all the GTX emblems and panels. “I would like to keep it era correct and swap out the motor with an L28 with triple Mikunis,” says Rick, adding, “and I still need to change out all the bushings from the suspension components which are not o...