Huntsman launches soft, flexible 3D printing materials logo-pn-color logo-pn-color

Huntsman Corp. is highlighting its advances in additive manufacturing technology at this year’s K show with the launch of Iroprint materials, available in filaments, powder and resin. Developed in close collaboration with major unnamed footwear and sportswear manufacturers, the thermoplastic polyurethane material is easy to print with the added benefit of being soft and flexible. “What we noticed is that this is a growing market, but there is a lack of the right materials for many applications,” said Stephane Peysson, global project manager, breakthrough innovation, additive manufacturing. The market, according to Peysson, has so far been driven by engineers “who develop great machines and take a material off the shelf and hope it will print.” In addition to that, many 3D printing materials currently available in the market are rigid, whereas a lot of consumer products need flexible materials. Developed over three years, the Iroprint platform includes Iroprint F filaments for fused filament fabrication and other extrusion-based methods, Iroprint R one-component liquid resins for stereolithography and digital light processing as well as Iroprint P p...

Nike Wants Your Sneakers to Fit Better, So It’s Using AR

Sometime last fall, a man walked into the Nike store in Pasadena, California. He was a runner, it was a running-centric store, and he was there to buy a pair of running shoes just like the ones he had worn in the past. The clerk asked him if he’d be willing to have his feet measured a new way. “I’m a 9,” the runner said. “I’ve always been a 9. Just give me a 9.” Still, he relented. The runner walked out with a size 10. What size shoe do you wear? Wait, let’s make that more specific. What size Nike do you wear? Depending on the model you’re talking about—Air Max, Jordans, Air Force Ones, a bootie-like shoe like a Flyknit Vapormax, or even a soccer cleat or other specialized performance shoe—you might be looking at a range of one and a half sizes. That’s due to a bunch of different factors: the shape of your foot, the materials of the shoe, the lacing or stitching pattern, even personal preference. That Pasadena store was one of three locations stealth-testing a technology the company calls Nike Fit—a system that takes all those factors into account and tells you exactly what size you really are, in any shoe Nike makes. A...